Andrew Yangs Dumb Gimmick Stepped on His Own Important Message

Andrew Yang has been my favorite Democrat to watch this election cycle, partly because hes the candidate I would most like to be friends with. Thats why I was so disappointed to see him resort to a how winners will be determined) actually steps on Yangs own messaging. Thats because Yang carefully avoids framing UBI as a giveaway (indeed, to qualify for the check, youd have to opt out of welfare payments). Instead, he sells it as something youve earnedlike Social Securityby virtue of being a citizen of the richest, most advanced country in the world. So why would an obviously smart entrepreneur squander the best chance he might ever have to make his substantive argument to a large TV …

Don’t Ask How to Pay for Climate Change. Ask Who

Last week, CNN announced plans to host a climate crisis town hall with the Democratic presidential candidates on September 4. MSNBC scheduled a multiday climate change forum with the presidential hopefuls later that month. In both venues, some version of the perpetual question will undoubtedly be raised: “How will you pay for the costs of dealing with climate change?” Despite its pervasiveness, this is a profoundly wrongheaded line of inquiry. Asking how to pay for the impact of climate change implies that these costs are a matter of choice. The reality is that global warming will impose massive costs, regardless of whether policymakers respond or not. Thus, the real question is not “How would you propose to pay?” but instead …

We Need to Build Up Digital Trust in Tech

For months, there’s been a steady march of controversies over how tech companies collect, manage, process, and share massive (and passive) amounts of data. And even though the executives and founders of these companies profess a renewed commitment to privacy and corporate responsibility, people are beginning to worry about surveillance and power—and reconsider how much faith they should put in both the leaders and services leveraging these quickly evolving technologies. The latest manifestation of these concerns came out of San Francisco, home to the tech economy: the city banned facial recognition technology to “regulate the excesses of technology.” As tech winds its way deeper and deeper into our lives, deeper questions arise: How can you trust someone you’ll never see? …