Hello, John Bolton? This Is History Calling

Is former National Security Adviser John Bolton going to sell it, or give it away? (It, of course, being his birds-eye view of the president putting his own interest, in getting an advantage in the 2020 election, over the interests of his country.) Will he or wont he? is the drama that remains after the pause, if not the end, of House Intelligence Committee hearings into impeachment. In a series of volleys after he wrested control of his Twitter account back from the White House, Bolton President Recep Trayyip Erdogan to turn against our Kurdish allies because of his business interests in Turkey, as Trump trumpeted a fakecease fire and a Russian flag was being raised over an abandoned base …

This Is Why Black Voters Dont Trust Mayor Pete Buttigieg

When South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg first entered the race, to be honest, I was mesmerized. He struck me as young, but brilliant. He spoke with compassion for the least of these and, led by his faith, he invoked the kind of Christianity long missing from the national discourseone that is inclusive, wrapped in love and equality, and that believes the test of us brings out the best in us. That he is gay and married was of no consequence to me, although I knew it would be for some. I wanted to believe that he would be the sort of candidate who challenged us to higher ground, but met us at our point of need. He has spent nearly …

Plutocrats, Please Stop Running These Selfish, Stupid, Quixotic Presidential Campaigns

At least on paper, Democrats talk tough about the importance of protecting the democratic process from a flood of billionaire bucks. Big money is drowning out the voices of everyday Americans, the released their own campaign finance reform proposals. Bernie Sanders put forward a bold plan that would claiming the title of single largest donor in American politics on several occasions. Whether you think that honorific is worthy of praise depends largely on whether or not your name is Tom Steyer. I was watching how this campaign was going, and in my opinion, the overriding issue today is that the politics of our country, the government, has been taken over by corporate dollars, Steyer staggering $47.6 million of his $1.6 …

Andrew Yangs Dumb Gimmick Stepped on His Own Important Message

Andrew Yang has been my favorite Democrat to watch this election cycle, partly because hes the candidate I would most like to be friends with. Thats why I was so disappointed to see him resort to a how winners will be determined) actually steps on Yangs own messaging. Thats because Yang carefully avoids framing UBI as a giveaway (indeed, to qualify for the check, youd have to opt out of welfare payments). Instead, he sells it as something youve earnedlike Social Securityby virtue of being a citizen of the richest, most advanced country in the world. So why would an obviously smart entrepreneur squander the best chance he might ever have to make his substantive argument to a large TV …

Don’t Ask How to Pay for Climate Change. Ask Who

Last week, CNN announced plans to host a climate crisis town hall with the Democratic presidential candidates on September 4. MSNBC scheduled a multiday climate change forum with the presidential hopefuls later that month. In both venues, some version of the perpetual question will undoubtedly be raised: “How will you pay for the costs of dealing with climate change?” Despite its pervasiveness, this is a profoundly wrongheaded line of inquiry. Asking how to pay for the impact of climate change implies that these costs are a matter of choice. The reality is that global warming will impose massive costs, regardless of whether policymakers respond or not. Thus, the real question is not “How would you propose to pay?” but instead …

We Need to Build Up Digital Trust in Tech

For months, there’s been a steady march of controversies over how tech companies collect, manage, process, and share massive (and passive) amounts of data. And even though the executives and founders of these companies profess a renewed commitment to privacy and corporate responsibility, people are beginning to worry about surveillance and power—and reconsider how much faith they should put in both the leaders and services leveraging these quickly evolving technologies. The latest manifestation of these concerns came out of San Francisco, home to the tech economy: the city banned facial recognition technology to “regulate the excesses of technology.” As tech winds its way deeper and deeper into our lives, deeper questions arise: How can you trust someone you’ll never see? …