Kellyanne Conway brushes off recession fears, calls it ‘Sesame Street word of the day’

Kellyanne Conway, a counselor for President Donald Trump, brushed off questions from reporters about a potential recession in the United States, liking the word to a segment on Sesame Street. Conway was asked about recent remarks by Trump where he said most economists dont believe a recession is looming for the country and whether she knew which specific economists the president was referring to. Yes, I do. But Id like to know where youre getting your information from, because its nice to see the media finally cover the Trump economy. You seem to cover it only when you can use the Sesame Street word of the day: recession,’ Conway said. So youre using a tweet here or a report there, …

50 Memes That Make Fun Of The Idea That Video Games Cause Violence

Some myths have more lives than cats and Mario combined. That’s the way plenty of us feel whenever we see someone blaming video games for every new armed atrocity that shocks the world. Look, we get it, video games are an easy target. It’s far easier to blame them for somebody acting violently than it is to confront the tangled, messy, complex web of interrelated reasons that’s actually at fault. But it doesn’t mean that we should power down our critical thinking, just because we want easy answers. Donald Trump, the President of the United States, and other politicians recently used video games as a scapegoat to (at least in part) explain the recent shootings in El Paso and Dayton. …

Kris Kobach: why Democrats hope the GOP won’t stop his run for US Senate

Tolerance for Kansass former secretary of state is waning, with Republican politicians saying the party has become too rightwing It was only nine months ago that Kansas Democrats were bidding good riddance to Kris Kobach as Donald Trumps closest political ally in the conservative midwestern state went down in flames. But now Kobach, who briefly spearheaded Trumps commission on the illusion of voter fraud after using his stint as Kansas secretary of state to target immigrants and then losing a disastrous campaign that cost Republicans the governors office is back and narrowly unseated the sitting governor in the Republican primary but then lost in the general election amid distaste among moderate voters for some of his positions, including calls for …

‘His only tool is racism’: why Trump’s bigoted tirade could be a vote winner

The president seems to regard divisive, nativist rhetoric as his best chance of staying in the White House. Analysts say he may be right It was foul and repugnant. But was it a vote winner? Donald Trumps bigoted tirade against four congresswoman of colour, telling them to go back to the countries they came from, prompted widespread revulsion the comments tweeted: Trump launched his political brand eight years ago saying the first African American President was born in Africa. It has always been about racism, and the fact that this has ever been a controversial thing to say is part of the problem. Trump is a minority president after winning 46% of the popular vote in 2016, less than Hillary …

Donald Trump is like a 20th-century fascist, says Sadiq Khan

London mayor hits out at US president before his state visit to Britain The mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, has compared the language used by Donald Trump to rally his supporters to that of the fascists of the 20th century in an explosive intervention before the US presidents state visit to London that begins on Monday. Observer, Khan condemned the red-carpet treatment being afforded to Trump who, with his wife Melania, will be a guest of the Queen during his three-day stay, which is expected to provoke massive protests in the capital on Tuesday. Khan said: President Donald Trump is just one of the most egregious examples of a growing global threat. The far right is on the rise around …

Mueller’s Bottom Line: Indicting Trump Wasn’t Even an Option

Special counsel Robert Mueller ended his two-year investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election with his sole public comment Wednesday, a surprise appearance at the Justice Department that had a clear and stark message: America, read my report. I worked long and hard on its 448 pages and chose my words carefully. Read them. The remarks came amid weeks of speculation over whether Mueller would testify before Congress about his investigation. But Mueller—who led a sphinx-like existence throughout his two-year probe—short-circuited that debate by speaking out on his own terms. In just over a thousand words and 10 minutes, he outlined the primary conclusions of his investigation and made clear, in his own obtuse way, that the next steps …