Boris Johnson Adopts Cute PuppyDog in Crucial Brexit Week

Boris Johnson welcomed his newly adopted Jack Russell puppy to his London home as the U.K. prime minister called an emergency meeting of his Cabinet, prompting fresh speculation there will be a general election. Just weeks ago the 15-week-old dog, named Dilyn according to a post on Twitter by Johnson’s partner Carrie Symonds, faced death after being abandoned by a south Wales puppy farmer as his misaligned jaw meant he would be difficult to sell. He was saved by a volunteer-run rescue charity in south Wales. Johnson’s predecessor, Theresa May, was encouraged to get a dog to increase her appeal to voters, but refused because she was concerned about who would look after it. Published on Updated on Original Article …

Dorian Winds Weaken but Storm Remains `Extremely Dangerous’

Hurricane Dorian is continuing to bash the Bahamas but its winds are weakening as the storm widens out, and forecasters are looking for signs it’s ready to turn north on a run up the U.S. East Coast rather than slamming head on into Florida. Dorian is continuing to move forward at just 1 mile per hour, according to a 2 p.m. advisory by the U.S. inflicting colossal damage to property and infrastructure in the Bahamas. Located about 25 miles (56 kilometers) from Freeport, Dorian has Dorian will cause In a briefing, Florida Governor Ron DeSantis said Florida utilities have assembled 17,000 personnel to help restore power quickly as needed. He said 72 nursing homes and assisted living centers along the …

David Koch obituary

US businessman, free marketeer and rightwing activist David Koch, who has died aged 79, was ranked as the eleventh richest person in the world. Charles wanted to minimise the role of government and maximise the role of the private economy … and personal freedoms, but the brothers philosophy was self-serving, protecting their worth and working against regulation of their business interests. David was the more public of the two, his philanthropy extending beyond the brothers massive spending on rightwing thinktanks, academic programmes, activist organisations and campaign funding; he was a major donor to the arts and medicine, especially in New York, where he maintained homes in Manhattan and the Hamptons. He moved between them, Aspen (Colorado), Palm Beach (Florida) and …

Global trade disruption is a symptom of a deeper malaise | Mohamed El-Erian

Resolving US-China trade war is not enough to ward off what many fear is a looming worldwide recession It is only a matter of time until the escalating tensions between China and the US prompt many more economists to warn of an impending global economic recession coupled with financial instability. On 5 August, Bloomberg News Larry Summers, a former US treasury secretary who was also closely involved in crisis-management efforts in 2008-09, recently The Only Game in Town, all of these recent developments and also, of course, the growing US-China tensions are related in a meaningful way to two basic and persistent features of the global economy since the 2008 financial crisis. The first is the prolonged period in which …

The $26.5B T-Mobile/Sprint Merger Moves a Big Step Forward

The Justice Department Friday cleared T-Mobile’s long-delayed $26.5 billion merger with Sprint, a deal that critics say will reduce competition for wireless service and lead to higher prices. To win approval, the companies agreed to sell assets to Dish intended to help the company, which now provides satellite TV service, launch a new wireless carrier. The Justice Department blessing clears a major hurdle, but the deal still faces an antitrust suit from 13 states and the District of Columbia that could mean further delays. If completed, the deal would strengthen T-Mobile’s position as the nation’s third-largest wireless carrier, with almost 114 million subscribers, after accounting for the 9 million Sprint customers that will be transferred to Dish. AT&T is the …

No More Deals: San Francisco Considers Raising Taxes on Tech

At a recent postmortem for the so-called Twitter tax break, the divisive San Francisco policy that drew tech companies to a beleaguered stretch of downtown, the tone at City Hall was chilly. Tech offices—the likes of Twitter, Zendesk, and Uber—had indeed arrived as promised, but residents of the city’s Mid-Market neighborhood told officials that little uplift came with the logos. “I’ve seen the number of people who are sleeping on the street increase. We’ve seen a lot of displacement … affordable restaurants close,” said Sam Dennison, a local resident who served on a citizen advisory board for the tax break. “We felt like we were going to be annihilated, and in a lot of ways we weren’t wrong.” In the …

Surprise! Huawei Can Actually Innovateand Win Fans

Huawei doesn’t leap to mind as an innovative company. In the US, the Chinese telecom giant is best known for the government’s national security concerns—and allegations that it stole intellectual property from companies like Cisco and Motorola. Yet Huawei was the fifth-biggest research and development spender in the world in 2017, according to a European Union report. Its €11.3 billion ($12.9 billion) R&D spend that year outpaced Intel (€10.9 billion), Apple (€9.7 billion), and Nokia (€4.9 billion). Huawei claims its investments over the years have paid off in the form of 87,805 patents—11,152 of which were granted in the US. Now Huawei is trying to turn those patents into cash. This month Reuters reported that Huawei wants Verizon to pay …

Senators Want Facebook to Put a Price on Your Data. Is That Possible?

In these days of anti-tech ire, it’s a popular cocktail hour topic: How much is Facebook making off my data? Last year, I spent a month trying to find out, hawking my personal data on blockchain-based marketplaces. I came away with $0.003. On Monday, when Senator Mark Warner (D-Virginia) announced a proposal to force tech companies to tell users the value of their data, he was slightly more generous, ballparking the average at $5 a month. In truth, it’s probably only Facebook or Google (and their advertisers) who could hazard a good guess. “The cards are really stacked against us,” says David Carroll, a professor of media design at the New School known for his extensive quest to reclaim his …

Big Data Supercharged Gerrymandering. It Could Help Stop It Too

The Supreme Court’s conservative justices ruled Thursday that the highest court doesn’t have the power to address partisan gerrymandering, the practice in which politicians redraw district maps to help their own party win more elections. In two cases, Lamone v. Benisek and Rucho v. Common Cause, the court split along ideological lines 5 to 4. Chief Justice John G. Roberts wrote the majority opinion, concluding that “partisan gerrymandering claims present political questions beyond the reach of the federal courts.” The cases concerned two instances of redistricting, one in North Carolina, where plaintiffs said the map was gerrymandered to favor Republicans, and another in Maryland, where plaintiffs said it was designed to favor Democrats. Justice Roberts agreed that the states’ district …

YouTube Is Giving You More Control Over Video Recommendations

YouTube has been at the center of a long series of scandals in recent years, many concerning one of its main features: the recommendation algorithm. The software encourages users to watch one video after another, which are served up on a menu labeled “Up Next.” Dubbed the “great radicalizer,” the algorithm has been accused by critics of guiding people down a rabbit hole of increasingly extreme content. To address the issue, YouTube began reducing the number of times it recommended things like conspiracy theories and bogus miracle cures. Now, the company wants to give more control over the algorithm to its users. Starting Wednesday, you can block specific channels from appearing in your YouTube recommendations, the company announced in a …

We Need to Build Up Digital Trust in Tech

For months, there’s been a steady march of controversies over how tech companies collect, manage, process, and share massive (and passive) amounts of data. And even though the executives and founders of these companies profess a renewed commitment to privacy and corporate responsibility, people are beginning to worry about surveillance and power—and reconsider how much faith they should put in both the leaders and services leveraging these quickly evolving technologies. The latest manifestation of these concerns came out of San Francisco, home to the tech economy: the city banned facial recognition technology to “regulate the excesses of technology.” As tech winds its way deeper and deeper into our lives, deeper questions arise: How can you trust someone you’ll never see? …

FCC Chair Backs T-Mobile and Sprint Deal, Clearing Hurdle for Merger

T-Mobile's proposed $26.5 billion merger with Sprint just cleared its first legal hurdle, as Federal Communications Commission chair Ajit Pai says he will recommend that the agency approve the deal. The FCC will most likely follow his lead, but the deal still needs approval from the Justice Department, where antitrust enforcement staffers have expressed concerns, Bloomberg reports. In an announcement, Pai said Monday that the two companies agreed to expand their rural coverage if the merger is approved, by building a 5G wireless network that will cover 97 percent of the US population within three years and 99 percent of the country within six years. Pai says the new network will cover 90 percent of rural residents within six years. …